March/April 2012 Issue

Boitson’s mission is to have something for everyone, from burgers to foie gras – locally sourced, of course.  “It’s a neighborhood restaurant that I think appeals to almost every demographic,” says owner Maria Philippis, 42.  “You can come in and have a burger and a can of beer, or a bottle of champagne and oysters.”

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February 18, 2011

Buzzing American Bistro

Half the fun of eating at Boitson’s is the happy-hour vibe that permeates the place even during hours not officially designated to be happy. In neighborhood bistro style, it’s a casual, easygoing spot where you’ll see everyone from the nose-stud set to local suits, blue collar workers, and chic weekenders, all settling in at the marble-topped tables or sipping a cocktail beneath the leaded-glass “Lubrication” sign hanging over the bar.

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September 10, 2010

An old storefront in Kingston’s Uptown, a sliver of a space that retains its pressed-tin-ceiling charm, has received a sumptuous update by its new tenant: Boitson’s Restaurant. Boitson’s possesses a carefully considered yet comfortable elegance — dark leather banquettes line one wall, along a half-dozen marble-topped tables. Antique stained-glass signage and a collection of vintage seltzer bottles give the bar a speakeasy feel, as do the tiered hard-boiled-egg racks. On entering, you feel almost as if you’ve slipped back in time.

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June 29, 2010

Boitson’s, whose casually elegant, dark blue and gray décor was the work of Kingston interior designer Brian Early, opened June 4. “It’s been great, really busy,” said owner Maria Philippis. She named the eatery after her Brooklyn landlord, who had always encouraged her to open her own place. Boitson’s has a raw bar, and it’s open for lunch and dinner Thursday through Monday. Burgers, fried chicken, steak, trout, and a beet risotto are served every night, along with five or six specials cooked up by chef Fred Duffus. The prices range from $10 for a burger to $25 for a New York strip steak. Bread pudding, chocolate pot de crème, and lemon tart are among the delectable desserts. There’s a full bar.

Be sure to check out the frescos in the bathrooms, which were inspired by sailor’s tattoos and are the work of New York artist Impala. There’s also a deck in back, with a view of the Catskills. Philippis said she is drawing customers not just from the neighborhood but also Rhinebeck, Stone Ridge, and High Falls—and that’s without advertising.

July 28, 2010

Boitson’s owner Maria Philippis, an on-and-off Hudson Valley resident for the past 20 years, has finally come home to stay and open her dream restaurant. The long, narrow dining room, lined with a room-long banquette and mirrors, leather, and velvet, leads to an outdoor deck with views of the Catskills. From the marble-top bar, Boitson’s serves an array of cocktails—many named after New York City boroughs. Go for little-neck clams ($7) and Blue Point oysters ($9) from the raw bar and entrees like the Boitson burger and fries ($10), whole trout meuniere ($21), fried chicken and mashed potatoes ($15), or roasted beet risotto ($14). Four-dollar sides include biscuits and gravy, succotash, and bacony collards. To support eating locally, many of the ingredients on the menu are purchased at the Kingston Farmers Market.

July 14, 2010

The new eatery at 47 N. Front St., despite its elegant ambiance, features more casual dining with an emphasis on fresh and local, according to owner Maria Philippis. Open a little more than a month, Boitson’s already has regulars who stop for the restaurant’s signature oysters and daily specials, including lobster, at reasonable prices, she said in a recent interview.

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July 9, 2010

“Boitson’s, Uptown Kingston’s newest eatery, is hip, comfortable and a deal”

It was a steamy Monday night when my hubby and I went to check out Boitson’s, Uptown Kingston’s new bistro on North Front Street, but it felt like a Saturday in there — the joint was jumping! The room is long and narrow, with tables lined up against banquettes along one wall and a bar (under a backlit sign declaring “Lubrication”) on the other. Every seat was taken, and people perched on the dozen or so stools at the bar were eating as well as lubricating…

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